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Pinterest: My Book Comes To Life

12 May

Creating Pinterest boards keeps the themes of my book constantly before my reader’s eyes. The visual representations related to physical locations featured in my book actually helps bring the book to life in a creative way. My Pinterest boards have become a visual companion to BORN IN THE LAND OF THE TANGO.

The enjoyment I derive from finding images on Flickr becomes an added benefit in the process. I have found unique and inspiring portraits and landscapes
otherwise unknown to me. Part of the value of using Pinterest involves the process re-pinning, an important element in making connections.

Thanksgiving 2011 Myths and Facts

23 Nov

Thanksgiving 2011 Myths and Facts.

I appreciate the question raised in this article as to whether what we have come know as “the first Thanksgiving” in Plymouth was perhaps not a true Thanksgiving:
“American Indian peoples, Europeans, and other cultures around the world often celebrated the harvest season with feasts to offer thanks to higher powers for their sustenance and survival…”
“In 1541 Spaniard Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and his troops celebrated a “Thanksgiving” while searching for New World gold in what is now the Texas Panhandle. Later such feasts were held by French Huguenot colonists in present-day Jacksonville, Florida (1564), by English colonists and Abnaki Indians at Maine’s Kennebec River (1607), and in Jamestown, Virginia (1610), when the arrival of a food-laden ship ended a brutal famine.”

Source: National Geographic

Thanksgiving 2011 Myths and Facts

23 Nov

Thanksgiving 2011 Myths and Facts.

I appreciate the question raised in this article as to whether what we have come know as “the first Thanksgiving” in Plymouth was perhaps not a true Thanksgiving:
“American Indian peoples, Europeans, and other cultures around the world often celebrated the harvest season with feasts to offer thanks to higher powers for their sustenance and survival…”
“In 1541 Spaniard Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and his troops celebrated a “Thanksgiving” while searching for New World gold in what is now the Texas Panhandle. Later such feasts were held by French Huguenot colonists in present-day Jacksonville, Florida (1564), by English colonists and Abnaki Indians at Maine’s Kennebec River (1607), and in Jamestown, Virginia (1610), when the arrival of a food-laden ship ended a brutal famine.”

Source: National Geographic